Back to Blog home

Browsers, performance and interventions

Published on Sunday February 25, 2007 by Zack Rusin in Aggregated WebKit | Comments

This week I beat WebKit Qt's rendering into shape. I rewrote the theming and canvas code.
It works so nicely that I'm actually pretty happy with it. The rewrite helped me fix issues with statically positioned elements (which just didn't work on a scrollview/canvas combination I did before). Due to which my blog finally looks and behaves correctly as seen on the screenshot above. That plus scrolling is about 10x faster and you never see gray areas on scrolling as you did before.
This week George Staikos has been here in Oslo to work with us on the networking code. George and I have been friends for five or six years and he has this nasty habit that forces me to start an intervention and try to get him off it. What I'm referring to is the fact that George has been Canadian for, well his entire life, and it is my professional opinion (but I'm not a doctor) that he needs to move on. I'm not sure in which culture it is customary to bring Snapple ice-tea to your friends when you come to see them but we need to change him to that because he definitely didn't bring me any this time and that's just rude.
Going back to work, I'm sure Lars will blog about the networking magic they did so I'll keep my mouth shut. Once the code they were working on will be ready (which should happen within next week or two) and we'll start using in WebKit, we'll make the transition and start using WebKit Qt based browser on a daily basis. So we're close which is pretty exciting.

We have also started optimization run for Qt 4.3. My grand plan is to make sure Qt 4.3 is 2x faster in general rendering code than Qt 4.2 was. I have a list of algorithms to shave and rewrite over the next few weeks which will be rather challenging.
By the way of performance some people noticed that Qt OpenGL in recent snapshots with Antialiasing turned on is actually slower than it was in Qt 4.2. It's because of an experiment that we're trying on. We're now using GLSL to antialias primitives. Of course it's a lot slower than the old code but produces very high quality results. I don't really like it though because the performance hit is just too big.

Subscribe to Our Blog

Stay up to date with the latest marketing, sales and service tips and news.

The blog comment system has been migrated to a new platform. If you face any issues, please let us know via feedback@qt.io.